'Prank It Forward' joke gives waitress an amazing day

On a day where anything out of the ordinary probably makes you either paranoid or lands you on the wrong end of a prank, a feel-good trick has us smiling on April Fools' Day.

Chelsea Roff is no ordinary waitress, and a customer's generosity was no ordinary tip. Organizers of a hidden camera video arranged for Roff to get $1,000, and that was the least of her special day. (Via Social News Daily)

BREAK.COM ORGANIZER: "That's your car."

ROFF: "Why are you doing this?"

BREAK.COM ORGANIZER: "Let's do this. Because I want to give you a tip today."

ROFF: "Who are you?"

BREAK.COM ORGANIZER: "I'm giving you a car. Come on! Let's see who's inside."

The car and reuniting with an old friend was the culmination of a full day of surprises for Roff. (Via AOL)

If you're wondering why friends, coworkers and eventually Break.com wanted to give Roff so much, you have to know her background. A severe eating disorder gave her a stroke as a teenager, so a therapist suggested yoga as a way to keep in shape without burning too many calories.

ROFF: "Before I knew it, I'd gained 20, 30 pounds and had done a yoga teacher training and was teaching yoga at a juvenile detention center and it became sort of a love affair for me." (Via CNN)

Roff now runs Eat Breathe Thrive, a nonprofit organization that uses yoga to help people fully recover from eating disorders and negative body image.

As part of Break.com's "prank," Roff got the money, the car, two plane tickets for a vacation to Hawaii and an introduction to a clinical psychologist who wants to work Roff's yoga into her patients' eating disorder treatment.

Gizmodo gushed over Roff's surprise writing, "‚ÄčInstead of coming up with idiotic ideas, perhaps all the dumb companies trying to push their stupid April Fools' Day 'jokes' down our throats should start making some actually awesome pranks. Like this one."

For every 1,000 views each "Prank It Forward" video gets, Break.com says it will donate $1 to the nonprofit website DoSomething.org with a ceiling of $30,000.

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