Heat Safety, Conservation Tips

Safety Tips

  • When temperatures are unusually high, you can visit PG&E-supported Cooling Centers to escape the heat, free of charge. For information on Cooling Centers, or to find out if there is one in your neighborhood, contact your local city or county.
  • If your neighborhood does not have a Cooling Center, plan trips to public places with air conditioning such as libraries, movie theaters or shopping malls.
  •  “Look Up and Live!” – Use caution and keep fireworks, balloons, kites and toys (such as high powered water guns or remote control aircraft) away from overhead electric lines. Contact with lines can lead to serious injury, fires and outages.
  • Never go near a power line that has fallen to the ground, is dangling in the air or appears to be damaged. Always assume downed electric lines are energized and dangerous. Stay away, keep others away and immediately call 911 to alert the police and fire departments.
  • Be sure smoke alarms are installed throughout your home.
  • If your smoke alarms run on batteries, or have battery back-up power, replace batteries at least once per year. If the low battery warning beeps, replace the battery immediately. All smoke alarms in your house should be tested once a month using the alarm test button.

Conservation Tips

  • Set your air conditioner thermostat to 78 degrees or higher when you're at home, health permitting, and 85 degrees when you’re away.
  • Setting your AC thermostat 5 degrees higher will save about 10 percent on cooling costs.
  • Shut windows and draw the shades to keep in pre-cooled air from the night and early morning.
  • Have your central cooling duct system checked for leaks. Up to 20 percent of cooled air can be lost through leaky or poorly insulated ducts.
  • Buy an ENERGY STAR® air conditioner if your air conditioner is ready to be replaced. It can reduce energy usage by up to 10 percent.
  • Avoid using an electric oven on hot days. Instead, cook on the stove, use a microwave oven, or grill outside.

In addition to conservation, utilities depend on “demand response” programs to keep the grid stable during summer months. Demand response programs are voluntary and allow enrolled customers to receive an incentive for reducing their energy use during peak demand times, like weekday afternoons.

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