Part of a trillion dollar government bill will benefit disease research, including valley fever

Government bill helps valley fever research

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - A $1.1 trillion spending bill will be going to the CDC and the NIH for disease research.

Those diseases include ones that impact the Central Valley, including a disease that kills citrus trees, and valley fever.

"We are in need of  greater public awareness, greater treatment, greater ability to diagnose this infection," said Kern Co. Public Health Service's Claudia Jonah.

On average, Kern County deals with nearly 2,000 cases of valley fever a year, and many more go untreated.

"They couldn't figure out what was wrong with him, and he was working down in long beach, so he was going to the doctor down there. And i asked if he's gotten a valley fever test because it sounds just like it.. and said they didn't test for it down there, but it turns out he had it," said Jessica Einstein, who has had friends with valley fever.

The money will go towards raising awareness of valley fever for both doctors and patients.

Doctors say the best way you can avoid coming down with valley fever is to just limit the amount of time you stay outdoors, and stay away from activities like dirt biking, or anything that involves a dirt path. 

"If you work outdoors, play outdoors, this fungus prefers and is probably more often found in areas where the soil is not disturbed," said Jonah.

Valley fever symposium members will be hosting an awareness walk on August 9th, and are currently planning out the details. A $1.1 trillion spending bill will be going to the CDC and the NIH for disease research. 
 
Those diseases include ones that impact the Central Valley, including a disease that kills citrus trees, and valley fever.
 
"We are in need of  greater public awareness, greater treatment, greater ability to diagnose this infection," said Kern Co. Public Health Service's Claudia Jonah. 
 
On average, Kern County deals with nearly 2,000 cases of valley fever a year, and many more go untreated. 
 
"They couldn't figure out what was wrong with him, and he was working down in long beach, so he was going to the doctor down there. And i asked if he's gotten a valley fever test because it sounds just like it.. and said they didn't test for it down there, but it turns out he had it," said Jessica Einstein, who has had friends with valley fever. 
 
The money will go towards raising awareness of valley fever for both doctors and patients. 
 
Doctors say the best way you can avoid coming down with valley fever is to just limit the amount of time you stay outdoors, and stay away from activities like dirt biking, or anything that involves a dirt path.  
 
"If you work outdoors, play outdoors, this fungus prefers and is probably more often found in areas where the soil is not disturbed," said Jonah.
 
Valley fever symposium members will be hosting an awareness walk on August 9th, and are currently planning out the details. 
 
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