UPDATES on Boston bombing suspect

Boston bombing suspect will go to fed. court

WASHINGTON -  

White House: Tsarnaev to be tried in federal court
 
The White House says the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing will not be tried as an enemy combatant in a military tribunal.
 
White House spokesman Jay Carney said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev will be prosecuted in the federal court system.
 
Tsarnaev is a naturalized U.S. citizen. Carney says that under U.S. law U.S. citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. Carney says that since Sept. 11, 2001, the federal court system has been used to convict and incarcerate hundreds of terrorists.
 
Tsarnaev, 19, and his older brother and suspected co-conspirator, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were born in southern Russia.
 
The U.S. Attorney General says the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings has been charged with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction against persons and property resulting in death.
 
In a statement Monday, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder detailed the charge against 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
 
The charge carries a possible death sentence.
 
Tsarnaev made his initial court appearance in his room in Beth Israel hospital. He is listed in serious but stable condition.
 
Officials say Tsarnaev and his older brother set off the twin explosions at Monday's marathon, killing three people and injuring more than 180 others.
 
FBI: Bombing suspect used cellphone before blast
 
The FBI says in an affidavit that the Boston Marathon bombing suspect was seen using a cellphone after placing a knapsack on the ground at an explosion site.
 
   The document does not say whether suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-KHAR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) is thought to have used the cellphone as a detonator.
 
   The affidavit also says one of the bombers told a carjacking victim, "Did you hear about the Boston explosion? I did that."
 
   It says Tsarnaev had apparent gunshot wounds to the head, neck, legs, and hand when he was brought to a hospital after his capture Friday.
 
White House defends FBI query into Boston suspect
 
The White House is defending the FBI's performance in its 2011 inquiry into Tamerlan Tsarnaev (tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) one of the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings.
 
White House spokesman Jay Carney says it's clear that the FBI followed up on information it received about Tsarnaev. He says the FBI interviewed him and his relatives and didn't find any domestic or foreign terrorism activity.
 
The Russian FSB intelligence security service told the FBI in early 2011 about information that Tsarnaev was a follower of radical Islam. The FBI says it conducted interviews and provided the results in the summer of 2011. The bureau says it also checked U.S. government databases and other information to look into his telephone communications, possible use of radical online sites, personal associations, and travel and education history.
 
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