Father of Boston Marathon bombing suspects Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev says he is coming to U.S.

Father looking for 'justice and the truth'

MAKHACHKALA, Russia - The father of the two Boston bombing suspects says he will travel from Russia to the United States this week to seek "justice and the truth."

Anzor Tsarnaev told The Associated Press that he has "lots of questions for the police" and he wants "to clear up many things."

In the interview on Sunday he said only that he planned to go in several days, but the suspects' mother, Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, told journalists on Monday that the father plans to fly to the U.S. on Wednesday.

She said the family would try to bring the body of their elder son back to Russia.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed in a gun battle with police. His 19-year-old brother Dzhokhar was later captured alive but badly wounded.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev remained hospitalized and unable to speak Monday, with a gunshot wound to the throat.  It was not clear whether Tsarnaev was shot by police or inflicted the wound himself.

He was expected to be charged by federal authorities in connection with the deadly shooting of MIT police officer Sean Collier in Cambridge, said Stephanie Guyotte, a spokeswoman for the Middlesex District Attorney's office.

Authorities say Collier was shot in his cruiser Thursday night on the MIT campus. He lived in Somerville and was preparing to become a police officer in that city.

The most serious charge available to federal prosecutors would be the use of a weapon of mass destruction to kill people, which carries a possible death sentence. Massachusetts does not have the death penalty.

After the two brothers engaged in a gun battle with police early Friday, authorities found many unexploded homemade bombs at the scene, along with more than 250 rounds of ammunition, ABC News reported.

Surgeons at a Cambridge hospital said the Boston transit police officer wounded in a shootout with the suspects had lost nearly all his blood, and his heart had stopped from a single gunshot wound that severed three major blood vessels in his right thigh.

Richard Donohue, 33, was in critical but stable condition. He is sedated and on a breathing machine but opened his eyes, moved his hands and feet and squeezed his wife's hand Sunday.

A private funeral was scheduled Monday for Krystle Campbell, a 29-year-old restaurant worker killed in the blasts. A memorial service will be held that night at Boston University for 23-year-old Lu Lingzi, a graduate student from China.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick has asked residents to observe a moment of silence at 2:50 p.m. ET Monday, the time the first of the two bombs exploded near the finish line. Bells will ring across the city and state after the minute-long tribute to the victims.

The motive for the bombings remained unclear.

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