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Tick, Kincade fires continue to burn across California

Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Tick Fire
Posted at 8:29 AM, Oct 25, 2019
and last updated 2019-10-25 13:33:42-04

High Santa Ana winds and low humidity have impacted several wildfires within the last 24 hours. Here are the latest numbers on the fires burning in parts of Northern and Southern California.

The Tick Fire, burning in Canyon County and parts of Santa Clarita, has scorched almost 4,000 acres and is also at 5 percent containment.

No injuries have been reported, but at least 40,000 people remain under evacuation orders. At least six homes were burned according to the Associated Press.

The Tick Fire has forced school and campus closures throughout parts of Los Angeles County. All schools in the Sulphur Springs, Newhall, Saugus, and Castaic Union School districts will be closed because of the fire. College of the Canyons and Moorpark College will also be closed. And all San Fernando school students that are part of the L.A. Unified School District will not be going to class today due to the poor air quality.

CNN is reporting that the "Agua Dulce area, where the Tick Fire is burning, was part of the ongoing intentional power outages, said Lois Bruce, a spokesperson with Southern California Edison. The area was de-energized at about 8:50 am (local time) and blaze started at approximately 1:45 p.m., Bruce said."

Highway 14 remains closed in both directions from Agua Dulce Canuon Road to Sand Canyon Road. Also closed are southbound traffic off Agua Dulce and northbound traffic off Golden Valley Road. The northbound off ramp to Placerita Canyon Road is also closed.

The KIincade Fire, north of San Francisco in Sonoma County, has grown to almost 22,000 acres with only 5 percent containment. The fire has destroyed 49 structures and is threatening over 700 buildings.

According to CNN, "In an incident report filed with state regulators Thursday, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) said that just before the fire started Wednesday night, one of PG&E's high-voltage transmission lines went out. PG&E intentionally had shut off power in the area Wednesday to prevent equipment from sparking wildfires during dangerous weather conditions. That transmission line was not supposed to be "de-energized" because it was not part of the public safety power shutoff, according to the company."

No immediate injuries have been reported.

Over 70 engines and 1,200 personnel are fighting the flames, along with 12 helicopters and 32 bulldozers.