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Fmr. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan talks bridge collapse, Senate run

Scripps News chatted one-on-one with Larry Hogan, the former governor of Maryland and current Senate candidate.
Fmr. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan talks bridge collapse, Senate run
Posted at 10:42 AM, Mar 31, 2024

This weekend remains a weekend of uncertainty in Baltimore, Maryland, following the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge last week.

For perspective, Scripps News chatted one-on-one with Larry Hogan, the former governor of Maryland and current Senate candidate, about what the federal government’s role should be going forward.

“It is an incredible tragedy,” Hogan told Scripps News’ Joe St. George.

St. George spoke with Hogan near Camden Yards. While grieving the six lives lost, the city is also celebrating the return of baseball this weekend, something Hogan believes Marylanders need to do.

“I think they need to be together; it’s like the whole city and state have gone through a big tragedy,” Hogan said.

As far as government response, Hogan believes it will take years.

“I think it is going to be years before we come out of it,” Hogan says.

“It’s going to affect people’s jobs,” Hogan said.

St. George asked Hogan his thoughts on whether the government should play a role in supplementing the paychecks of wages lost by the Port of Baltimore being closed for an extended period of time.

“I think we got to take a look at those longshore men and the people at the port who may lose their jobs or not be paid for a while,” Hogan said.

“I have already reached out to a number of Senate leaders,” Hogan added.

SEE MORE: Authorities prioritizing bridge cleanup and removing debris

On Senate Run

One of the reasons Hogan is running for Senate is because of the active recruitment effort by several top Republicans, including former President George W. Bush.

St. George asked if George W. Bush could appear in a campaign rally for Hogan sometime this year.

“I’m not sure about that; I think he is enjoying retirement,” Hogan said.

“I’m a big fan of getting it back to a Reagan/Bush traditional Republican party,” Hogan added.

“His pitch was pretty convincing; he said, ‘I know you don’t want to be a senator; I didn’t want to be on either, but the party and the country needs you,’” Hogan said.

St. George asked why Hogan would want a job in Washington after several moderate Republicans—from Mitt Romney to Liz Cheney—decided to retire or were voted out of office.

Hogan acknowledged that Washington isn’t an ideal place to work right now.

“A lot of the good people are heading to the hills, and it doesn’t seem like it’s going to be a lot of fun, but I think it’s important for the country,” Hogan said.

As far as the expected criticism from Democrats toward Hogan when it comes to abortion rights, Hogan dismisses it.

“They are not going to be able to come after me for that because my position are nearly the same as all of theirs,” Hogan said.

As far as whether or not he would vote to codify Roe, Hogan did not answer the question directly.

“I think we have to take a look at the wording of the legislation,” Hogan said on that issue.

“There is no piece of legislation now to speculate about,” Hogan said.

The Cook Political Report currently lists the Maryland Senate race as “likely Democrat.” The Democratic nominee in the race will be chosen after the state’s May 14th primary.


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