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Study shows more Americans dying from opioid overdoses than car crashes

Posted: 12:37 PM, Jan 14, 2019
Updated: 2019-01-14 15:37:11-05
Study shows more Americans dying from opioid overdoses than car crashes

An alarming new report shows just how deadly the opioid crisis continues to be across the country.

A mass overdose inside a California home over the weekend killed one person and sent 12 others to the hospital.

“To get this many individuals, especially all at one time, to walk in and have six CPRs in progress, that's a pretty big deal,” said Jesse Alexander with the California Fire Department in Chico. “And no, I have not experienced that many cardiac events all at the same time

It's an example showing why opioid overdoses are now killing more Americans than car crashes, according to the National Safety Council.

“The opioid crisis is striking,” says Maureen Vogel with the National Safety Council. “Many people realize it's happening, but far too many still don't realize it could happen to them or that it does impact them.”

Vogel says opioid overdoses have been increasing every year since 1999, and the consequences have grown deadlier.

“We are losing more than 115 people every single day from accidental opioid overdose,” she says. “It's the definition of the public health crisis, and it is disproportionately impacting middle-aged Americans, but it is a threat at every age.”

Last year, Congress passed a bill aimed at finding less addictive drugs and expanding access to treatment.