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Almond trees attracting visitors, farmers see an increase in litter

"This is still an area we're growing food. And, so, when you're leaving trash, you're leaving trash in a food-producing area. That's problematic," said Jake Wenger, president of Stanislaus Farm Bureau.
Posted at 2:12 PM, Feb 24, 2021
and last updated 2021-02-24 18:31:32-05

(KERO) — As residents begin to flock to almond orchards, farmers are warning residents to be careful.

A group of farmers say they've seen an increase in litter since their crops have bloomed. It's common for visitors to come to the orchards this time of year looking for a pretty picture with the pink flowers now in full bloom.

But they want to remind the public that the pretty backdrop is more than just a photo, it's also food and could end up on your plate.

"This is still an area we're growing food. And, so, when you're leaving trash, you're leaving trash in a food-producing area. That's problematic," said Jake Wenger, president of Stanislaus Farm Bureau.

now almonds are typically only in blossom for around two weeks but the issue of visitors leaving trash is year-round problem