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Closing arguments finish in the second trial of Tastries Bakery

Tastries Bakery and Boutique, Bakersfield
Tastries Bakery and Boutique Owner Cathy Miller (FILE)
Posted at 4:41 PM, Jul 29, 2022
and last updated 2022-07-29 21:58:41-04

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KERO) — The closing arguments in the second trial of a local bakery owner who refused to bake a wedding cake for a same-sex couple back in 2017 are now complete. That owner, Cathy Miller, was sued by the Department of Fair Employment and Housing for refusing to make the cake claiming it goes against her religious beliefs.

The trial for the Department of Fair Employment and Housing vs. Cathy's Creations began on Monday, with closing arguments delivered Friday. Now, we're awaiting a final decision.

Back in 2017, Eileen and Mireya Rodriguez had requested a wedding cake from Tastries Bakery. However, they were denied service by bakery owner, Cathy Miller. She says she refused to bake the cake because she does not condone same-sex marriage.

In an effort to resolve the situation Miller did refer the couple to another bakery in Bakersfield to fulfill their request.

A discrimination case was then filed in 2018 against Miller by the state. However, a Kern County judge ruled in favor of Miller saying the First Amendment protected Miller’s speech in her refusal to make the cake.

Charles Limandri, special counsel representing Cathy Miller said in court on Thursday that she believes marriage is a sacred institution between a man and a woman. However, the state is representing the Rodriguez couple says that Miller’s refusal went against the Unruh Act which states all persons in California are free and equal no matter their sexual orientation and are entitled to full and equal services.

Gregory Mann who presented the closing arguments for the DFEH says "how can you have life liberty and the pursuit of happiness when you walk into a business and the business sells a product to the person in front of you and says, 'I'm not going to sell to you because of who you are?'"

Limandri stated in his closing arguments that Miller was being true to her biblical principles and argues Miller has faced a firestorm of hatred on social media following these lawsuits.

The judge now has 90 days to issue a ruling.

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