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Forest Service to Begin Prescribed Burning Projects

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Posted at 2:18 PM, Nov 28, 2016
and last updated 2016-11-28 17:18:38-05

The Kern River Ranger District, in the Sequoia National Forest/Giant Sequoia National Monument, has several hazardous fuel reduction projects scheduled for this fall and winter.  These projects fall under the Breckenridge Plantation Thinning Project, Breckenridge Forest Health and Fuels Reduction and the Tree Mortality Response plans.

The projects entail pile burning on two mountaintops and along a portion of the Kern River.  Forest Service crews have been working in the areas stacking piles and preparing fire lines for burning this fall.  This prep work is necessary to ensure the project work is accomplished safely and to provide control measures.

The Breckenridge Plantation Thinning Project and the Breckenridge Forest Health and Fuels Reduction Projects will include piles in Breckenridge Campground, Road Nos. 28S07, 28S08 (Golf Meadow), and 28S22 (Munzer Meadow).

The Tree Mortality Response piles are located in designated and dispersed camping areas along the Upper Kern River north of Kernville, in addition to Alder Creek and Fulton Work Center in the Greenhorn Mountains, and Troy Meadow Campground on the Kern Plateau.

Fuel reduction activities on the projects will have beneficial impacts on forest health and public safety in the project areas by reducing the risk of a stand-replacing fire and restoring natural ecosystems.

The Kern River Ranger District expects to burn 52 acres of piles this year in small units, designed to minimize effects of smoke on the community while reducing the potential for large, stand-replacing wildfires.

Smoke may be visible from several communities in and around Isabella Lake.  Road and trail closures are not anticipated.

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Fire managers work closely with the Eastern Kern and San Joaquin County Air Pollution Control Districts to manage smoke production and reduce any local impacts.

Prescribed burn efforts will continue throughout the winter when weather conditions and available resources permit. 

 

-courtesy U.S. Forest Service