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San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District issues health warning due to poor air quality

Warning residents to stay indoors.
Poor Kern County Air Quality
Poor Kern County Air Quality
Poor Kern County Air Quality
Poor Kern County Air Quality
Poor Kern County Air Quality
Poor Kern County Air Quality
Posted at 12:45 PM, Jul 12, 2021
and last updated 2021-07-12 15:56:51-04

KERN COUNTY, Calif. (KERO) — The San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District has issued a health warning due to the poor air quality caused by wildfires. The "health caution" impacts San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Merced, Madera, Fresno, Kings, Tulare, and the Valley portion of Kern.

The poor air quality is caused by particulate matter emissions.


What is Particulate Matter (PM), and how does it get into the air?

PM stands for particulate matter (also called particle pollution): the term for a mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. Some particles, such as dust, dirt, soot, or smoke, are large or dark enough to be seen with the naked eye. Others are so small they can only be detected using an electron microscope.

Particle pollution includes:

  • PM10 : inhalable particles, with diameters that are generally 10 micrometers and smaller; and
  • PM2.5 : fine inhalable particles, with diameters that are generally 2.5 micrometers and smaller.
    • How small is 2.5 micrometers? Think about a single hair from your head. The average human hair is about 70 micrometers in diameter – making it 30 times larger than the largest fine particle.

Sources of PM

These particles come in many sizes and shapes and can be made up of hundreds of different chemicals.

Some are emitted directly from a source, such as construction sites, unpaved roads, fields, smokestacks or fires.

Most particles form in the atmosphere as a result of complex reactions of chemicals such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, which are pollutants emitted from power plants, industries and automobiles.
Environmental Protection Agency


The district is warning residents who may be impacted by smoke to stay indoors. Particulate matter can trigger asthma attacks, aggravate chronic bronchitis, and increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.

"Those with existing respiratory conditions, including COVID-19, young children, and the elderly, are especially susceptible to the health effects from this form of pollution. Anyone experiencing poor air quality due to wildfire smoke should move to a filtered, air-conditioned environment with windows closed. Common cloth and paper masks being used as protection from COVID-19 may not be sufficient protection from wildfire smoke inhalation."