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2018 midterm elections saw higher turnout in every age and racial group, U.S. Census Bureau says

Posted: 10:01 AM, Apr 23, 2019
Updated: 2019-04-23 14:03:39-04
2018 midterm elections saw higher turnout in every age and racial group, U.S. Census bureau says

Last year's midterm election brought a huge amount of people to the polls, and numbers were up in every eligible voting age group, race and ethnicity.

The U.S. Census Bureau said 58 percent of eligible voters turned out in November 2018, understanding that who they choose in midterm races truly has an impact on the direction of the country.

It was the highest turnout in four decades.

By comparison, voter turnout for presidential election years is about 60 percent, and midterms average 40 percent.

Here are some of the highlights from the recent U.S. Census Bureau report on the 2018 midterms turnout:
• Among 18- to 29-year-olds, voter turnout went from 20 percent in 2014 to 36 percent in 2018, the largest percentage point increase for any age group — a 79 percent jump.
• Among men and women, voter turnout increased by 11 and 12 percentage points respectively.
• Voter turnout increased among non-Hispanic Asians by 13 percentage points, a 49 percent increase.
• Among Hispanics, voter turnout increased by 13 percentage points, a 50 percent increase in Hispanic voter turnout.
• Non-Hispanic black voter turnout increased by 11 percentage points.
• Those with higher levels of education had higher levels of voter turnout in 2018. Those with less than a high school education had the smallest increase in voter turnout (5 percentage points). Those with a high school diploma or equivalent had the second-lowest increase (8 percentage points).
• Voting by native-born and naturalized citizens both increased by 12 percentage points. This increase is not significantly different between native-born and naturalized citizens.
• Unlike the 2014 midterm election, voter turnout among those living in nonmetropolitan areas (up 8 points) was lower than for those living in metropolitan areas (up 12 points).

The report states there is a gender gap — 55 percent of women voted in the 2018 midterm election, which 52 percent of men voted.

"While younger women voted at higher rates than younger men, women age 65 and older voted at lower rates than men in the same age range.

In 2018, among those age 65 and older, voter turnout was 65 percent for women and 68 percent for men. In contrast, 38 percent of women 18-29 years old voted and 33 percent of men of the same age group voted."

Read the full report here.