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Governor of New Mexico to fill in as substitute teacher

New Mexico is latest state to launch substitute teacher initiative
classroom
Posted at 10:12 AM, Jan 24, 2022
and last updated 2022-01-24 13:12:09-05

The governor of New Mexico has signed up to become a substitute teacher as schools deal with staffing shortages.

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham is expected to teach in an elementary school classroom this week.

She has no prior experience in education, but she says there aren’t any other options, as school districts struggle to find enough teachers and substitutes.

Lujan Grisham has completed the registration to become licensed as a substitute teacher.

This comes after the governor launched an initiative last week, asking state workers and National Guard members to volunteer as substitute teachers in K-12 schools and as child care workers.

The initiative also speeds up the licensing process to two days.

So far, 50 National Guard members and 50 New Mexico state employees, including the Gov. Lujan Grisham, have volunteered to work as substitute teachers.

This is just one of many initiatives around the country to bring substitute teachers into classrooms.

Last week, the governor of Oklahoma, Kevin Stitt signed an executive order to relax requirements for substitute teachers.

Oklahoma now allows state employees to keep their current jobs while working in schools.

Kansas and Michigan will allow people with no college credits to become substitute teachers.

California is speeding up its hiring process for subs.