Your Health Matters

Actions

New study shows extreme heat could hurt well-being

Netherlands Drought
Posted at 11:49 AM, Aug 31, 2022
and last updated 2022-08-31 18:46:21-04

The results of a new study might be another reason why some people do not prefer hotter weather.

According to a new analysis by Gallup in partnership with Citi, those who live where it is extremely hot could see their physical health and sense of well-being negatively affected than those who don't live in extreme heat.

Researchers said they surveyed 1.75 million people across 160 countries using temperature data from NASA over 15 years.

According to the study, before they interviewed respondents, researchers looked at high temperatures 30 days before interviewing people to compare their life ratings.

"Each time a person experiences a high-temperature day, their life evaluation drops by an average of 0.56%," researchers said in the study.

    According to the study, those who are 65 and older saw a 1.11% drop in life evaluation, compared to a 0.48% drop among people younger than 65, the study said.

    Researchers also found that those who live in poorer countries and developing economies with significant populations, including China and Brazil, see their well-being be more impacted by rising temperatures.

    "Given climate projections, high-temperature days could decrease global wellbeing by an estimated 17% by 2030," researchers said.