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'Person' or 'persons of interest' identified in Nashville bombing, reports say

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Posted at 10:45 AM, Dec 26, 2020
and last updated 2020-12-26 16:12:46-05

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — CBS News is reporting that a "person or persons" of interest has been identified in the bombing in downtown Nashville on Christmas morning.

Nothing else is known -- neither the identity of those involved nor whether they're in custody.

USA Today also reporting that a person of interest has been identified in connection with the explosion.

In a press conference on Saturday, Police Chief John Drake said no additional explosive devices were discovered during a secondary sweep on Friday

Officials also hoping that within the next day or two that AT&T communications will be reestablished.

Nashville Mayor John Cooper added that a curfew is still in place until Sunday afternoon, so they are asking people to allow officials to investigate the scene where the explosion occurred.

Officials stated there are a number of individuals they are looking into, but officials cannot confirm anyone is in custody as they look into over 500 leads.

WATCH LIVE:

Three people were injured in the bombing that damaged at least 41 buildings in Nashville's downtown, including severe damage to an AT&T data center.

Following the Nashville bombing Friday, Governor Bill Lee formally requested in a letter that President Donald Trump declare a state of emergency.

On Friday, Metro Nashville police released a surveillance photo of an RV responsible for what they believe was an intentional bombing

Following the explosion, police officials said tissue was found at the explosion site, but Police Chief John Drake could not confirm if it was a human victim of the incident. The AP said the remains were human, but could not confirm how the remains were related to the explosion.

According to WTVF, AT&T is still experiencing outages Saturday after an explosion occurred outside AT&T's data center in downtown Nashville. The impacts are widespread, including calls, texts, internet, television, and credit card systems.

This story was originally published by Catlin Bogard at WTVF in Nashville, Tennessee.