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What is 'quiet quitting' and why it's gaining popularity on social media

Trump says he's set Sept. 15 deadline for TikTok sale, says buyer should also pay US government
Posted at 11:50 AM, Aug 22, 2022
and last updated 2022-08-22 18:01:04-04

Not going above and beyond at work is nothing new, as some people only put in the effort at work needed to get the job done.

But it’s getting new attention with a name that has taken over social media. A lot of people on Tik-Tok are calling it "quiet quitting."

“It’s really all about doing the bare minimum at work to achieve that work-life balance,” said Blair Heitmann, a LinkedIn career expert. “But there really is this divide and this debate about whether you’re doing that to achieve the work-life balance to move away from this hustle culture or are you just phoning it in because you’re not into your job.”

Worker engagement is falling across generations, according to survey data from Gallup. Generation Z and younger millennials reported the lowest employee engagement.

Recent data from LinkedIn showed that 33 percent of people want a better work-life balance. Some said they would be willing to trade some of their pay for it.

Career experts said you can set healthy boundaries at work and still perform well in your position.

If you’re having difficulty getting that balance, your manager should be open to working with you on a plan to refocus where you’re spending your time at work, experts said. If you’re just not enthusiastic about what you’re working on, but like where you work, your manager may also be receptive to that.

“Say, ‘Here are the areas where I feel like we’re making the most impact. These are areas where I actually am really interested in growing and mentoring and here’s what I would love from you as my manager to help me get there,’” said Heitmann.

If your manager isn’t working with you, it may indicate your job isn’t the right fit.