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Breaking down ballot measures in California's 2022 election

The seven measures include abortion rights, school funding for the arts, banning tobacco, taxes on the wealthy, kidney dialysis requirements and two measures on the legalization of sports betting.
Posted at 12:05 PM, Jul 10, 2022
and last updated 2022-07-10 15:46:24-04

(KERO) — California voters will weigh in on seven ballot measures this fall, include abortion rights, school funding for the arts, banning of tobacco, taxes on the wealthy, kidney dialysis requirements and two separate ballot measures on the legalization of sports betting in California.

In Proposition 1, the initiative asks voters to amend the state constitution to guarantee a right to an abortion and contraceptives. As it stands, California's right to an abortion is based on a right to privacy in the state constitution. But, the U.S Supreme Court's ruling overturning Roe V. Wade found the right to privacy does not guarantee the right to an abortion.

If passed, this amendment would make abortion explicitly legal in California.

Next is Proposition 30, that would raise taxes by 1.75% on people who have at least 2 million dollars in personal income per year.

Supporters say it would bring in between three and 4.5 billion dollars in new revenue each year with 45% of those funds reportedly going to rebates and other incentives for purchasing electric cars.

Plus 35-percent of the funds would be for charging stations construction and 20% would be for wildfire prevention programs, with an emphasis on hiring and training firefighters.

Lastly, Prop 31 asks voters whether a 2020 law that outlawed the sale of certain flavored tobacco products in California should take effect or be overturned.

This is because when the state legislature passes a law, voters have the power to stop it from taking effect if they can gather enough signatures to put a referendum on the ballot.

That's what tobacco companies did and the law was delayed until voters decide in November.

These are the fewest number of measures to appear on a statewide general election ballot since 2014.