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Climate change causes 'extreme heat,' officials give health warning

Anytime numbers get much higher than what a community is used to, it can be dangerous, even if it doesn't seem that hot to someone who lives outside of that area.
Extreme heat
Posted at 10:22 AM, May 19, 2023

(KERO) — As average temperatures warm across the United States and the globe, "extreme heat" is happening more often according to the nonprofit science group Climate Central.

An analysis by the nonprofit found that 232 US cities are seeing more risky heat days since 1970, an average of 21 more days per year. However, it's not all about triple-digit temperatures.

Anytime numbers get much higher than what a community is used to, it can be dangerous, even if it doesn't seem that hot to someone who lives outside of that area.

164 people die due to extreme heat every year, according to the National Weather Service. Extreme heat is the deadliest weather hazard in the United States.

"Heat has been referred to as a silent killer because people don't necessarily know what are the warning signs that they should be watching out for in terms of heatstroke and dehydration and other health-related impacts due to exposure to heat," said Angel Hsu, a professor of public policy and the environment at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

The Centers for Disease Control say that staying hydrated, cutting down on time outside, and staying up to date on weather alerts will help keep the general public safe.