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A 'powerful' new project aims to lower energy costs for the City of Arvin

The City of Arvin and Veolia North America broke ground on solar energy installation
Posted at 5:34 PM, May 20, 2024

ARVIN, Calif. (KERO) — The three-million-dollar project is installing a one-megawatt solar field at the southeast end of the Arvin wastewater treatment plant.

  • The three-million-dollar solar project broke ground on Monday, and is located in the southeast end of Arvin.
  • In addition to using green energy, the installation will also reduce carbon emissions, the equivalent of 200 households, which ultimately lowers costs for the city.
  • With Arvin being the first city to have these installations, it's a project that other cities may consider as it's financially attractive.

BROADCAST TRANSCRIPT:

A project that the City of Arvin is calling 'revolutionary' broke ground on Monday. It's a solar energy installation that will decarbonize the city's wastewater treatment plant.

The three-million-dollar project is installing a one-megawatt solar field at the southeast end of the Arvin wastewater treatment plant.

"It will make the wastewater treatment plant net neutral in terms of energy, so it will not have to take any more energy from the grid," said CEO of Veolia Sustainable Industries and Buildings.

In addition to using green energy, the installation will also reduce carbon emissions, the equivalent of 200 households, which ultimately lowers costs for the city.

"It saves the City about 230 thousand dollars in energy costs," said Arvin City Manager and Finance Director Jeff Jones. "It will be an immediate cost savings so that we can invest in the infrastructure the city needs."

Also improving their green footprint are their EV charging stations and electric buses—making Arvin a sustainability leader in Kern County on a per capita basis.

With Arvin being the first city to have these installations, Schultz said it's a project that other cities may consider as it's financially attractive.

"What's unique about this project and I think it's something that other communities can replicate is that it doesn't require any additional investment from the city," said Schultz. "It's being financed with the Inflation Reduction Act in part that pays for up to 40 percent of the investment upfront."

According to Veolia, the project is expected to be completed in a year.


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