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Local woman teams up with Montana rescue to transport shelter dogs

Posted at 10:38 AM, Jan 13, 2024
  • Video shows Lorin Blodorn helping relocate shelter dogs.
  • Lori Blodorn started volunteering with the shelter and a few organizations a year ago. While she’s always loved animals, she said it was while she was assisting the group “Friends of Abandoned Dogs” that she understood the crisis.
  • Now she's teamed up with a Montana rescue to transport dogs in our shelter.

Animal relocation and transport can be the key to saving more lives in our local shelters. One local woman is trying to do her part to help abandoned animals, but the problem expands beyond our shelters and rescues.

“Our rescues are full, our shelters are full. The transport network is very hodgepodge," said Lori Blodorn.

Blodorn started volunteering with the shelter and a few organizations a year ago. While she’s always loved animals, she said it was while she was assisting the group “Friends of Abandoned Dogs” that she understood the crisis.

“I don’t think I’ll ever get this image out of my mind for as long as I live," she said. "It was this dog off in the distance that was on top of a pile of mud, clearly just given up.”

The more she learned about the amount of work going into helping abandoned animals, the more she felt the desire to help.

When she came across a set of German Shepherds who were struggling to find a home, she wanted to do something but she didn’t know what. That was until she told her daughter in Montana.

“I was just talking to her about how heartbroken I was about these two dogs," she said.

Blodorn’s daughter was able to connect her to “Life Savers Animal Rescue” in Montana, who not only agreed to take the German Shepherds but a few other dogs.

But it was no easy task.

“You not only have to figure out transport you have to figure out short-term fosters," Blodorn said.

She said while they were able to save those dogs — the process just showed her how much goes into addressing the larger issue.

Organizations like Wings of Rescue have been relocating and transporting animals out of Kern County’s crowded shelters for years. Over the last three months they’ve sent more than a hundred dogs to less crowded shelters.

“You see these things every day and I’m just one person doing one very small thing but that is how this heartbreaking operation is happening every day. It’s individuals who are here networking dogs," Blodorn said.

Now Blodorn's working to send five more dogs to Montana, but she knows she’s only one small piece of the puzzle.

“Probably at least once a day I want to look away, because this is so hard and it’s so heartbreaking," she said. "But this is so important and these animals need us."


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