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History Days in Kernville brings Kern River Valley history to the community

The Kern River Historical Society is comprised of volunteers run the Kern Valley Museum and put on various events throughout the year
Posted at 6:22 PM, May 19, 2024

KERNVILLE, Calif. (KERO) — The event gave people a chance to experience the Museum and the Annex, and displayed the many local volunteers whose passion and dedication keep the historical society running.

  • The next historical society event will be a screening of The Kansan on Saturday May 25.
  • The event is about showing off the unique history of the valley, but perhaps more importantly, beginning the community together to have fun – and food was front and center.
  • The event gave people a chance to experience the Museum and the Annex, and displayed the many local volunteers whose passion and dedication keep the historical society running and capable of putting on large events like this.

BROADCAST TRANSCRIPT:

The Kern River Valley Historical Society manages to achieve a lot all with volunteer work, which is exemplified in their annual event History Days.

“How could we possibly use a bicycle to do more than one ice cream maker?” said John Newman, President of the Kern River Valley Historical Society.

The Kern River Valley Historical Society’s history days had many eye-catching contraptions, but the most unique one was born out of the Society’s tradition of holding ice-creams socials that featured hand cranked ice cream — Newman married this tradition with his love for bikes.

“We could actually churn out three gallons of ice cream in about 25 minutes because you are using your legs on a bicycle.”

The event is about showing off the unique history of the valley, but perhaps more importantly, beginning the community together to have fun – and food was front and center

Hand churned (and bike churned) icecream, bread baked with coals, chuck-wagon chili and hand churned butter were made by dedicated volunteers and dispersed to the public.

And historical machinery was on display too, old machines showing how corn meal could’ve been made in 1910.

“At first I didn’t even know what the engine did,” Said tourist and Hostroy Days visitor Jim Machkoff, “And then he explained how the oil works and how the water cooled, yeah it was really interesting.”

Machkoff comes to Kernville every year to camp with a group of friends.

“It’s a great town.”

“The Kern River valley is different, this is not Bakersfield, it's not Los Angeles. It’s a small rural community and our sense of place gives us a deep sense of security,” said Newman.

Displays representing the history of the valley were set-up, including blacksmithing, gold panning, and spinning.

“Our sense of place gives us a deep sense of security,” Newman said.

“People up here seem to like history more than usual,” said Machkoff.

The event gave people a chance to experience the Museum and the Annex, and displayed the many local volunteers whose passion and dedication keep the historical society running and capable of putting on large events like this.

Newman says the event is focused on the local community.

“Our neighbors, we know who they are, and our history is deeply tied to that. Where we can from, who we are, where we’re going.”


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