BPD searching for Trevon Foreman, deadly shooting suspect

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. - (UPDATE: Thursday, August 23, 2018 5:13 p.m.) Anthony Michael Gage, who was arrested along with Trevon Lee Foreman has been committed to a department mental health-state hospital for a maximum term of commitment for 3 years according to the DA.

Bakersfield Police are still looking for a suspect wanted in connection to a deadly drive-by shooting last week in east Bakersfield. 

The shooting killed Ruben Antonio Garcia, 26, and injured two others in the 1200 block of E. 10th Street.

Investigators have obtained an arrest warrant for Trevon Foreman, who was believed to be involved in an hours-long standoff on Sunday.

Foreman, 22, is wanted for charges of murder, conspiracy and participation in a criminal gang.

Anthony Michael Gage, 21, was arrested on Sunday and faces the same charges. 

23ABC did a background check on Foreman and discovered he was one of three people arrested in March 2016 on weapons and gang charges in northeast Bakersfield.

Bakersfield Police found a Mac-11 assault weapon in a car he was in following a brief chase on Alta Vista. Foreman and two others were arrested after the weapon was thrown from the car. All charges against Foreman were subsequently dropped.

Just two weeks later, on April 1, 2016, Foreman was arrested on 14 felony charges.

Those charges included possessing an assault rifle, carrying a loaded firearm with intent to commit a felony, and reckless evading a peace officer. All but one of the charges were dropped. Foreman pleaded no contest to a gang member carrying a loaded firearm in public. He was sentenced to two years at Wasco State Prison.

In December 2017, Foreman was arrested again.

Last month, charges were dismissed. Foreman took a plea deal on Feb. 20 for 32 months in prison for taking a car without owner's consent. He was out on bail awaiting sentencing when he allegedly was involved in last week's shooting.

One criminal defense attorney said there needs to be more pretrial resources in place to assess whether someone is a danger to the community before bail is set. "They simply look at a list of charges and say ok horse stealing, cow wrestling  and name calling and they say well $20,000, $20,000 and $10,000 that's $50,000. A person is then allowed to post cash bail and then they get out, they don't even begin  to asses what is that person's cognitive development is," Criminal Defense Attorney Kyle Humphrey said.

Humphrey also said there needs to be higher bail set once someone is deemed as a threat to the community to insure public safety.

Anyone with information about this investigation is asked to contact BPD at (661) 327-7111.

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